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My Long-Term Goals

By: Steve Johnson

7/18/2008 - 75 Comments

Goals are very important because they give direction and motivation. Studies show that only 3% of the general population writes down their goals.

Every year I write down a few goals for the next year and look at the list from last year. Some of these goals get passed on to the next year for several years before they are achieved and sometimes they get crossed off because they are no longer important. 

I also like to look back at the many long-term goals that I have already accomplished. Here are a few:

  • Get a college degree
  • Pay off all college loans
  • Get married
  • Have kids
  • Buy a house
  • Pay off everything but my mortgage
  • Start a business
  • Read constantly
  • Spend lots of time with my family

The last fifteen years have been great as I have succeeded in completing many of my goals. My current long-term goals are the most important to me in the next few years. These are the goals that are on my mind as I think about my current job, investments and family. 

Here are a few of my long-term goals:

  • Invest in my kids
  • Pay off my house
  • Own and grow my own business
  • Grow my investment cash-flow beyond my cost of living (financial independence)

The most important goal I have right now is investing in my kids. And I don’t just mean saving for their college. I take this goal so seriously that I have molded my entire family around raising my kids. Most goals are about success and failure, but not my kids, they are about love. My motivation for my kids far exceeds my motivation for financial gains by any means because my relationship with my kids will extend after we are dead and in heaven.  The love I have for my kids in based on the love my father in heaven has for me.

I think that many people today have a misguided motivation or lack of motivation for the sake of their kids. Kids don’t need more money or toys; they need more time with their parents, as Dr. Dobson has explained in his book, “Bringing Up Boys” and Josh McDowell has explained in his book “How To Be A Hero To Your Kids”.   

Bringing Up Boys: Practical Advice and Encouragement for Those Shaping the Next Generation of Men

 

How To Be A Hero To Your Kids

 

Besided by kids, the next fifteen years are going to be the best financial years of my life, as I receive the bulk of my income from my working years.  I will need to start thinking about my estate planning, college funding for my children and retirement.  What will I be doing at age 50-60-70?

Here are a few long-long-term goals that I would like to do someday;

  • Go back to college just for the fun of learning whatever I want to
  • Work for a non-profit organization while helping young people
  • Create a small business that is fun while providing for people through employment
  • Help people discover the true meaning of life and how Jesus Christ is the real deal
  • Become a teacher at a University
  • Become a successful writer

Goals are fun to think about, but keep in mind that they are not in stone. So if you don’t meet your goals, don’t be too hard on yourself. Just change your goals to be more realistic with what you can or are accomplishing. 

Keep your goals simple and tell your friends about them so that you can learn from the discussion about what they think your goals are based how they see your decisions. Be honest with yourself about what you want to do and take one step at a time. If you want a better life, then start setting goals.

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